Tinea Unguium (Onychomycosis)

Call 973-763-7546 For Your Nail Fungus Consultation Today About tinea unguium (onychomycosis) Tinea unguium, also known as onychomycosis, is infection of the nail—usually the distal nail bed—with a dermatophytic fungus. The usual culprits are Tricophyton rubrum and Tricophyton mentagrophytes, with T. rubrum being the most common cause of distal subungual onychomycosis. The nail appears discolored… Read More

Tinea Pedis

What is Tinea Pedis? Tinea pedis, more commonly known as “athlete’s foot,” is a dermatophytic infection of the feet. It occurs in three forms: Interdigital. This appears as scaling and maceration between the toes. It is the type frequently seen in patient’s with sweaty feet. Diffuse plantar scaling. This appears as general scaling of the… Read More

Tinea Manuum

What is Tinea Manuum? Tinea manuum is dermatophytic infection of the palm. It is relatively uncommon, and almost always occurs in patient’s that also have tinea pedis (athlete’s foot). It usually only involves one hand, giving rise to the “one hand, two feet” syndrome of tinea manuum plus tinea pedis. It appears as diffuse scaling… Read More

Tinea Faciale

What is Tinea Faciale? This dermatophytic infection of the face appears typically as a serpiginous, erythemetous rash with a sharply demarcated border. With what can tinea faciale confused? Chronic irritant contact dermatitis can also cause scaling on the face, as can seborrheic dermatitis. Tineal faciale may occasionally mimic the rash of a photodermatitis or the… Read More

Tinea Cruris

About Tinea Cruris Tinea cruris, less glamorously known as “jock itch, is a dermatophytic infection of the groin. Patients also commonly have tinea pedis (athlete’s foot). Moisture from perspiration is likely the predisposing risk factor for both of these rashes. Tinea cruris may not be annular, but it will be seripiginous, elevated, and scaling. The… Read More

Tinea Corporis

About Tinea Corporis Tinea corporis, also known as “ringworm”, is a fungal infection of the body. History of exposure to an infected pet or dog is common. The classic lesion is annular (hence the name “ringworm”), with an elevated, scaling border and a central clearing. Some lesions may be serpiginous rather than annular. With what… Read More

Tinea Diagnosis, Treatment and Prognosis

With the exceptions of tinea capitis and tinea unguium, which typically require systemic antifungal treatment, most tinea infections are diagnosed and treated in a similar fashion, and carry a similar prognosis. Tinea diagnosis The dictum “if it scales scrape it” is the guiding principle in diagnosing fungal infection. A simple KOH preparation revealing hyphae is… Read More

Tinea Capitis

About tinea capitis Tinea capitis is a superficial dermatophytic fungal infection of the scalp, usually caused by Tricophyton tonsurans, Microsporum canis, or Microsporum audouinii. Clinically, the disease ranges from scaling patches to a boggy, inflamed, pustule-studded plaque (kerion) accompanied by regional lymphadenopathy (swelling of lymph nodes). Patchy alopecia (hair loss) studded with broken hair shafts,… Read More

Androgenetic Alopecia (common baldness)

About Androgenetic Alopecia Androgenetic alopecia, or common baldness, is a genetically determined sensitivity of the hair follicle to androgens. It occurs post-pubertally in both males and females and is manifest by the non-scarring loss of hair in the vertex and frontotemporal areas. Terminal hairs are first replaced by thin, small vellus hairs. Eventually the follicles… Read More

Telogen Effluvium (Stress-Induced Alopecia)

About Telogen Effluvium Diffuse hair loss can result from physical or psychological stress such as: childbirth (most common cause), high fever, chronic illness, emotional stress, physical stress, nutritional deficiency, and various drugs. The hair loss occurs several months after the stressor. This cause of the hair loss is termed telogen effluvium, and results from the… Read More